New Online Resource: Wiley Medical & Nursing Collection

Trust staff & students on placement at the Trust are now able to access over 400 additional online journal titles, as part of our new online journal collection!

Titles in our new Wiley online journal collection include; Journal of Advanced Nursing, BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology,  Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology and British Journal of Dermatology to name a few. There are more titles to be discovered in our new promotional video (shown below), alternatively you’ll find a full list of our new Wiley titles here.

To access the new journal titles (and lots of other online resources) staff/students will need an NHS OpenAthens account. If you’re not yet registered, you can self-register for an NHS OpenAthens account here.

If you have any queries about the new collection or setting up an NHS OpenAthens account please get in touch with a member of The Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust Staff Library staff who will be happy to help 😀

My work experience

Hello my name is Harvey, I am 15 and for my work experience I have been at the staff library for the past week. Firstly I would like to say that the staff working in the library, that consist of Karen, Natasha, Helen and Dianne were very generous, kind and supportive towards me. If anyone who reads this hasn’t yet been to visit the library, you should definitely go check it out as you might find something of interest!

I have thoroughly enjoyed my work experience as I have undertaken various tasks, in and out of the library. From small task such as shelving books or folding leaflets, onto bigger tasks which include scanning and stamping books. I visited many different departments in the hospital too, such as the eye centre and the general office one of my favourite things about the week was that I was assigned the task to create a new display in the library all about “self-help”.  I gathered together some books and created a new poster which I found fun.

On Thursday me and Natasha visited Fieldhead, had a tour of its library and then went round the Mental Health Museum. This was very interesting, as there was a padded cell which I entered with the door closed. The hospital in general and especially the museum had an eerie atmosphere, as it was and still is a hospital for mental health and psychiatry.

All together I have really enjoyed my work experience this week, I have met some great people and will look back at the week with fond memories.

Thanks , Harvey.

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All views and opinions are my own.

CILIP conference 2017 reflections on Our Common Values…

It was my first time…at a CILIP conference, after over 17 years in libraries, so finally I made it! Initially I was concerned with practicalities, trains and hotels and connecting up with the YOHHLNet bursary winners. Once sorted I had to  set about deciding what I wanted to see and hear. My main aim was to avoid listening to anything to do with the day job, so knowledge management and impact/evaluation, task and finish groups and tool-kits so predominant in the health library sector at the moment were given short shrift [with apologies and a big wink to all those engaged in such things].

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I wanted to see/hear something new, something that might move me and/or make me think differently. Two sessions in particular did this for me. This first blog post looks at David McMenemy’s @D_McMenemy talk on ‘sustaining our common values: the pressure at play, and to come…’ I found this really interesting and thought-provoking.

BEING UNIVERSAL

David began by asking us to think about what being ‘universal’ meant for libraries, a library for you whoever you are and wherever you come from…and how this was being challenged by the fragmentation of public library services where community and charity run libraries are increasingly replacing that ‘universal offer’. This was particularly interesting to me because my local library is one of those voluntary run community libraries, its great and thriving and the local population I believe absolutely love what it offers both in terms of resources and in terms of Place. As David said it does fit nicely with the Government drivers to enhance community well-being via the use of more volunteers and charitable activities.

But of course not every village or small town has the wherewithal in terms of resources [specifically people with the enthusiasm AND the knowledge/know-how to set-up their own library service] so that immediately places these populations at a disadvantage. With the loss of the universal offer, who you are and where you come from starts to handicap you in terms of access to libraries.libs for everyone

One of the points made was with regard to Who sets the library up, is it a specialist interest group within the community? Or is it weighted towards a particular social class? What might this mean for universal access and is this likely to influence the kinds of resources/activities available? Would it feel or even become exclusive? A library for some but not for everyone, whoever you were and wherever you came from?

PRIVACY

The other aspect of our common values focused on the issue of patron privacy, essentially protecting the right of our patrons’ to privacy in terms of  their online activity. As with other organisations LIS have the technologies to hand to analyse the users online searching activities, and to filter out particular content. I found this really interesting because I often simply take this for granted, or don’t even think about what is happening to our service users and indeed myself as a seeker of information in an online world.

Are we both:

  • snooping into someones private business and 
  • interfering with an individual’s right to seek information 

I also found it useful to note that because technology allows us to see what our service users are doing online doesn’t mean that we should just go ahead and access that information, and is it up to us to censor content?

So the central message seemed to  me that we should be asking questions, reflecting upon and thinking critically about the values we have within the LIS community. Through research the evaluation and analysis of these values could form the evidence base for a set of commmon values for the future. To see the presentation given by David click here

Helen Rotherforth  librarian   @midyorkslibrary 

 

 

 

 

 

What’s New? July 2017

What’s New? is a monthly current awareness bulletin for staff working within clinical and non-clinical environments.

The bulletin brings together the latest guidelines/standards/appraisals, reports and reviews to keep staff up to date.

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You can download the latest bulletin, and all previous editions, directly to your desktop from the library website.

If you are a Trust employee and would like copies of What’s New? delivered to your inbox every month, please contact the library by e-mail library.pgh@midyorks.nhs.uk or by telephone (ext 53899).

Focus On: Reading Well for Long Term Conditions Collection

This week The Reading Agency launched a new strand of their popular Reading Well Books on Prescription scheme, Reading Well for Long Term Conditions.

Reading Well for Long Term conditions focuses on supporting those living with long term conditions such as arthritis, bowel conditions, diabetes, heart disease and stroke. More information on Reading Well for Long Term conditions can be found on The Reading Agency website.

Long Term Conditions Books

We have a selection of titles from the Reading Well for Long Term Conditions collection available at Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Staff Library for loan to Trust staff and students on placement. You can find a full list of Reading Well for Long Term Conditions titles held in library stock in our library resources for long term conditions guide. We hold a selection of other self-help, mindfulness & mood boosting books in our library stock too.

You can also find the Reading Well for Long Term Conditions collection, amongst other strands of the Reading Well Books on Prescription scheme, in your local public library.

Wakefield Public Libraries have a large range of self help books that are available to loan free of charge with a library membership, you can view their catalogue here. For information on how to join Wakefield public libraries you can visit any Wakefield Library or you can join online using this link 

As part of Health Information Week 2017  Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust Library staff will be in the atrium at Pinderfields Hospital  with staff from Wakefield Public Libraries on Friday 7th July, where they will be showcasing their new Reading Well for Long Term Conditions collection alongside a range of resources and services provided through Wakefield Public Libraries. More information can be found here

 

Upcoming events for Health Information Week

Many organisations across different sectors are collaborating for Health Information Week 2017 (3-9th July 2017). This campaign aims to improve accessibility of high quality health information for the public as well as building on local partnerships between information providers and improving health literacy.

It is essential that quality information is provided to people to enable them to better manage their health and wellbeing and make fully informed decisions about their treatment and care. Library and Knowledge specialists are uniquely positioned to underpin this vital agenda, working in partnership with clinical staff and other information providers.Patrick Mitchell, Regional Director – South of England, Health Education England (HEE)

As part of Health Information week 2017 the Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust Staff Library will be working in partnership with Wakefield Public Libraries to promote good quality health information for the benefit of our staff and the public by raising awareness of the resources that are available to them, both online and in print.

Health information week activities

On Tuesday 4th July Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust Library staff will be joining Wakefield Public Libraries from 12:30pm to 14:30pm at Wakefield One to promote and signpost the public to reliable health information sources.

If you’re unable to pop by you can find links to a selection of reliable health information sources on our patient health information web page.

On Friday 7th July Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust Library staff will be in the atrium at Pinderfields Hospital with staff from Wakefield Public Libraries between 10am and 11.30am where they will be showcasing their new collection on ‘living with long-term conditions’ alongside a range of resources and services provided through Wakefield Public Libraries.

We hope to see you there 😀.

If you are unable to pop by and see us at either event we will be Tweeting (@midyorkslibrary) throughout the week using the hashtag #HIW2017

 

 

Focus on: e-Learning for Healthcare

e-Learning for Healthcare (or e-LfH for short) is a Health Education England Programme working in partnership with the NHS and professional bodies to support patient care by providing e-learning to educate and train the health and social care workforce’ (http://www.e-lfh.org.uk/about/ accessed 30/05/17).

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The e-Lfh hub hosts a wide range of e-Learning programmes, from the Care Certificate to Management and Leadership skills. A full list of programmes can be found here.

Before you can access any of the programmes you will need to register/log in. You can do this by clicking the purple button in the top right hand corner of the e-Lfh page or by clicking this link to the e-Lfh portal.CaptureOnce the e-Lfh portal loads choose ‘sign in with OpenAthens’.

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You will then be prompted to sign in with your OpenAthens account details (if you’re not yet registered with OpenAthens you can register for free here).CaptureIf you’re accessing e-Lfh for the first time using your OpenAthens account the ‘linking your e-Lfh’ page should be displayed.

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If you already have an e-Lfh account enter your current log in details in the relevant boxes on the left, and click ‘find your account’ to link your OpenAthens account.

If you don’t have an e-Lfh account choose the ‘proceed to next step’ option on the right, you will then be prompted to enter your email address (as registered with OpenAthens). Once you’ve done this click ‘create account’. Your account should now be linked😀.

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Now you’re account is linked and you’re logged in you should see your personal dashboard displayed, which should look something like this ⬇️.

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The ‘My e-Learning’ tab shows the programmes which you have enrolled into. To enroll into other learning programmes click on the ‘view full catalogue’ option. This will then bring up a full list of learning programmes.

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To enroll in any of the training programmes listed, click on the programme name (you may need to do this twice) then press ‘enrol’ & ‘continue with enrolment’

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The new training programme should now show up in your account dashboard. You should now be able to play/access the assigned training programmes from here.

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If you’d like any further help accessing e-Learning for Healthcare please ask a member of library staff who will be happy to help with any queries you may have 😀