CILIP conference 2017 reflections on Our Common Values…

It was my first time…at a CILIP conference, after over 17 years in libraries, so finally I made it! Initially I was concerned with practicalities, trains and hotels and connecting up with the YOHHLNet bursary winners. Once sorted I had to  set about deciding what I wanted to see and hear. My main aim was to avoid listening to anything to do with the day job, so knowledge management and impact/evaluation, task and finish groups and tool-kits so predominant in the health library sector at the moment were given short shrift [with apologies and a big wink to all those engaged in such things].

dr seuss

I wanted to see/hear something new, something that might move me and/or make me think differently. Two sessions in particular did this for me. This first blog post looks at David McMenemy’s @D_McMenemy talk on ‘sustaining our common values: the pressure at play, and to come…’ I found this really interesting and thought-provoking.

BEING UNIVERSAL

David began by asking us to think about what being ‘universal’ meant for libraries, a library for you whoever you are and wherever you come from…and how this was being challenged by the fragmentation of public library services where community and charity run libraries are increasingly replacing that ‘universal offer’. This was particularly interesting to me because my local library is one of those voluntary run community libraries, its great and thriving and the local population I believe absolutely love what it offers both in terms of resources and in terms of Place. As David said it does fit nicely with the Government drivers to enhance community well-being via the use of more volunteers and charitable activities.

But of course not every village or small town has the wherewithal in terms of resources [specifically people with the enthusiasm AND the knowledge/know-how to set-up their own library service] so that immediately places these populations at a disadvantage. With the loss of the universal offer, who you are and where you come from starts to handicap you in terms of access to libraries.libs for everyone

One of the points made was with regard to Who sets the library up, is it a specialist interest group within the community? Or is it weighted towards a particular social class? What might this mean for universal access and is this likely to influence the kinds of resources/activities available? Would it feel or even become exclusive? A library for some but not for everyone, whoever you were and wherever you came from?

PRIVACY

The other aspect of our common values focused on the issue of patron privacy, essentially protecting the right of our patrons’ to privacy in terms of  their online activity. As with other organisations LIS have the technologies to hand to analyse the users online searching activities, and to filter out particular content. I found this really interesting because I often simply take this for granted, or don’t even think about what is happening to our service users and indeed myself as a seeker of information in an online world.

Are we both:

  • snooping into someones private business and 
  • interfering with an individual’s right to seek information 

I also found it useful to note that because technology allows us to see what our service users are doing online doesn’t mean that we should just go ahead and access that information, and is it up to us to censor content?

So the central message seemed to  me that we should be asking questions, reflecting upon and thinking critically about the values we have within the LIS community. Through research the evaluation and analysis of these values could form the evidence base for a set of commmon values for the future. To see the presentation given by David click here

Helen Rotherforth  librarian   @midyorkslibrary 

 

 

 

 

 

Reflection: Many Ways to Learn Event 2017

Wednesday 31st May 2017 was the Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust ‘Many Ways to Learn event, in celebration of Learning at Work Week 2017.

learning at work.jpg

The event was an opportunity to showcase the wide range of opportunities which are available to Trust staff to support development and further study. From information on a range of free online courses, information on learning/development opportunities within the Trust to representatives from Huddersfield University & The Open University who were on hand to provide information and advice to staff interested in further study.

The Occupational Health team ran a range of health & wellbeing sessions throughout the day, including sessions on mindfulness and stress awareness. The event also included taster sessions in British Sign Language from Topp Language Solutions, flower arranging & even origami. There definitely was something for everyone 😀

During the event members of the library team ran a number of activity sessions which helped attendees learn how to use Canva, set up a Twitter account & get started on Facebook.

 

The sessions were delivered on a one to one basis, which we found to be the most effective teaching method (due to the amount of information to share). This also allowed us to tailor our sessions to suit the needs of individuals. The library team agree that the activity sessions were a success and may be something we could repeat in future… watch this space!

Here’s some of the feedback we received from our session attendees:

MWL Comments from our attendees(1)

If you weren’t able to attend the Many Ways to Learn event but would like some help getting started with Canva, Twitter or Facebook our social media help guides can be downloaded here.

Until next time…

Natasha 😀

Focus On: Trip Database

Today we wanted to shine the light on Trip Database – a tool which allows healthcare professionals to find the best available evidence to answer their clinical questions.

The database contains links to thousands of sites, offering the highest levels of evidence, such as systematic reviews and clinical guidelines. As well as providing research evidence  users are also able to search across other content types such as images,videos,educational courses,news and patient information leaflets.

These graphics better show the features of this resource & the benefits of using it as a healthcare professional:

capture

capture

If your search highlights research studies that aren’t directly accessible in full-text never fear we are able to offer Trust staff a document supply service (contact us directly for more information).

If you want to find out more about using Trip Database these links are a good place to start:

How to use Trip

The benefits of using Trip

The Trip Database blog contains useful guides, tips & tricks. You can access it here.

Access to the premium version of the Trip database (Trip Pro) is freely available to everyone in the NHS in England (via Health Education England). It’s worth noting that Trip Pro is accessed via IP address (so you would need to access the database using an NHS computer).

Focus On: BMJ Best Practice

BMJ Best Practice is a useful online resource which follows a step-by-step approach that is structured around the patient consultation and covers diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and prevention. BMJ Best Practice is free for all NHS Mid Yorkshire Trust staff to access via NHS OpenAthens.

BMJ Best Practice Website

bmj

The BMJ Best Practice website allows users to access reliable decision-support information and ever evolving medical information on thousands of clinical topics. It also provides links to external sources which may be of interest and allows allows users to download information, including patient leaflets & PDF’s.

The website also has an CME/CPD activity tracking tool which logs your searches and active hours and allows users to create activity certificates to support revalidation and CME/CPD. More information on this can be found in this BMJ User Guide.

BMJ Best Practice App

The newly launched BMJ Best Practice app is now available for download on Apple & Android devices. It allows users to gain fast access to clinical answers on the move.

Before you can access the app you will need to register for a ‘personal BMJ account’ (or log in if you already have one).

If you need to set up a personal account here’s how to register:

Visit this link and log in via OpenAthens:

Capture.PNG

Once you are logged in via OpenAthens you will then be prompted to create a personal account:

capture2

Once you have registered for a personal account you will be able to access the app. Logging into the app via your personal account also ensures that your activity and active hours are logged in your CME/CPD activity tracker.

To download the app:

Visit the Apple or Google Play store and search for ‘BMJ Best Practice’

Select and download the app and when prompted, use your BMJ Best Practice ‘personal account’ details to sign in and download the content.

Once you have downloaded the new app please delete any old versions of the app you may have as they will no longer be updated.

If you would like further information on BMJ Best Practice please contact the library library.pgh@midyorks.nhs.uk. Or if you are a Trust staff member and would like to sign up to NHS OpenAthens you can register for an account here.

Please note:

 You must log in to your personal account whilst using your institution’s network at least once every 6 months, to keep your account active.

 

 

 

How & why to use social media – Twitter for Nurses

Twitter may be best known as a social network but it is also a great tool for professional development. You might ask, “how can it be useful for nurses?” The answer would be that you can keep up to date with all the latest news in healthcare, network with your peers, find open access articles from nursing journals and find helpful resources for revalidation and CPD. It’s also a lot of fun!

If you haven’t used Twitter before, here is a quick interactive guide to getting started.

twitter-logo

Once you’re set up, the following profiles are a good place to start your Twitter journey:

@Wenurses – The “We” community is a great place to engage with other nurses. They host lots of Tweet chats, which are advertised on their profile (participation it Tweet chats counts towards your CPD!)

@nmcnews – Keep up to date with the latest guidance from The NMC and find all the necessary resources for revalidation.

@theRCN – Keep up to date with nursing news from the RCN.

@midyorkslibrary – The latest healthcare news, resources, guidelines and more from Mid Yorkshire NHS Trust library.

@midyorkshireNHS – the official Twitter profile for Mid Yorkshire NHS Trust

Once you’re on your way with these, you’ll be able to find many other profiles of interest!

Guides for using Twitter

Twitter can seem like a daunting place at first but once you have the basics, you won’t look back. Below are a few links to help you get started. If you need any more help, drop into the Library, where a member of staff can assist with any questions you might have.

http://wecommunities.org/blogs/31 – Guide to Tweet Chats.

https://www.nmc.org.uk/standards/guidance/social-media-guidance – NMC standards for social media.

http://www.nhsemployers.org/search-results?q=social+media&sort  – Social media toolkits, guidance and blog posts about Social Media in healthcare.

Twitter jargon

There is a lot of jargon in Twitter that might make you nervous. There’s nothing to fear though! Here is our quick and easy guide to popular phrases used in the Twittersphere:

Twitter handle – the name of the profile (e.g. @midyorkslibrary, @Wenurses etc)

Hashtag (#) – a hashtag (#) is added to the beginning of a phrase (e.g. #NHS, #nursing, #cardiology etc) to gather all Tweets on the same subject in one place. You can also search for hashtags in the search box to find other Tweets on that subject or click on a hashtag you see on someone’s Tweet to see more.

@ (“at”) – used at the beginning of a Twitter handle to identify it as a profile. If you want that profile to see your Tweet, you should always have an @ (“at” them in it).

Retweet – Like a tweet enough to share it with your followers? Hit the retweet button.

Follow – Follow a profile to see all of their tweets in your timeline.

Timeline – A real time collection of Tweets from the profiles you follow.

Direct message (DM) – You can message a profile directly, without it being shared publicly by DM’ing them.

Tweet chat – a place on Twitter to discuss a subject. Identified by a hashtag created specifically for that Tweet chat.

Live Tweet – Events may have participants Live Tweeting. A hashtag will be created to gather all the tweets in one place (#MYITExpo)

So, what are you waiting for? Join us on Twitter today!

Information at your fingertips!

If you need information immediately, or don’t have your Trust log-in details to hand, why not use the library iPad?

The iPad is always switched on and ready for use.  You can easily access all the health databases, and find your way around BMJ Best Practice or the BNF and BNF for Children.

Perhaps you may need to access your e-mails to check a meeting time or venue, or simply check the library catalogue for book or journal availability.

Whatever you are searching for the library is here to help, so please pop down to see us when you are next in the vicinity.

ipad

Using Canva because it’s: FREE and useful

You may not know how exciting the FREE graphic design software (Canva) is and may feel you cannot read any further, but hold your horses because this piece is about to get much more interesting. Ask yourself: do you want to create professional looking designs for infographics, leaflets, flyers & presentations easily? If so then read on because although I have said this once it bears repeating, It’s FREE!

bears-repeatingToday I’m blogging about Canva which we in the library have been getting acquainted with for a few months now. We’ve been using the software to create promotional designs which we can then post on Facebook, add to Tweets, and sure enough here I am blogging about  design software.

One of the ways I have found it particularly useful is its role in marketing, gathering together visual images of latest resources adding some blurb and then sending it via  Twitter and Facebook to our followers. 

More targeted is where we add a graphic display of related resources into email lists.The recipients of which belong to a specific staff group, for example those working within the operating theatres received  our ‘all things theatrical’ infographic. all-things-theatrical

We  have had really favourable
reactions to this type of promotional activity.
  • We also use graphical software to promote information about the library more generally – any events looming or specific training courses we have upcoming. Once the graphic is created it can be used again at a later date, copied and edited which is all good recycling practice, saves time and provides us with a usable resource bank for all our promotional activities.

And…we’re getting better

  • developing our skills by using a wider variety of design formats from flyers to presentations and
  • we hope to be able to pass this new knowledge on to team members, colleagues, friends and basically anyone who’s interested.

Before I got it right I got it wrong lots of timelessons-learneds, this was mighty frustrating but the more I use it the more sense it makes, Canva has become almost indispensable to me at work and… I’m on a voyage of discovery with Prezi of which I will speak more about in the future…